Phone Number
(518) 421-6160
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21 Bullard Lane,
(5 minutes north of the mall)
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866

Can’t Sleep?

It is estimated that Americans spend $94 billion dollars, every year, just to get some sleep!  Lack of sleep builds up a “sleep debt,” which makes you feel tired during the day and may lead to a variety of health issues. Sleep debt is the cumulative amount of lost sleep. For example, if the average daily amount of sleep you need is eight hours, sleeping six hours a night during the work week creates a sleep dept of 10 hours in just one week. If you sleep an extra two hours on Saturday and Sunday, you will still have a sleep debt of six hours.

If you sleep only 6 hours a night for a year, you will have built up a sleep debt of 726 hours which equals one full month of missed sleep. The prevalence of sleep debt in America is reaching epidemic proportions. More than half of the adult population in the United States is carrying a sleep debt.

Possible Root Causes of Insomnia:

  • Toxic Liver – Surprisingly, this is one of the highest known causes of insomnia that occurs between 1-3 a.m. Liver cleansing thru diet and supplements can help
  • Fear – Most common contributor to Nightmares and Restless Sleep.
  • Diet – Certain foods aggravate insomnia and eating too lat at night effects proper digestion.
  • Hormonal Imbalance – Lack of melatonin and other key hormones can trigger insomnia through hot flashes, depression, irregular heart rate, etc.
  • Stress – Stress must be managed from the limbic region of the brain.
  • ADD-ADHD – Children and adults suffer from sleepless nights because of excess hyperactivity.
  • Pain – Annoying, Debilitating, Throbbing. Pain is a top contributor to insomnia and restless sleep.
  • Weakened Immune System – Viruses and bacteria can keep you awake.
  • Excitement/Anxiety – Too much of a good thing can be too much sometimes.

Join Deb Dittner and me to learn how to use Young Living essential oils to get to sleep, stay asleep, and add peace to your waking hours too.  Bring your friends and family.
Thursday November 20, 2014 from 6-7 pm at 21 Bullard Lane, Saratoga Springs, NY.
Please RSVP to Lesley (518) 421-6160 LWaters@MassageByLesley.com  or Deb (518) 596-8565, DebDittner@gmail.com


Don’t Worry. Be Happy

If you want happiness for an hour, take a nap.
If you want happiness for a day, go fishing.
If you want happiness for a month – get married.
If you want happiness for a year – inherit a fortune.
If you want happiness for a lifetime – help someone else.

If you want happiness anytime, try the Joy essential oil blend from Young Living.  It’s part of the everyday oils collection.  Visit www.Lesley.VibrantScents.com


Are You in the Habit of Thinking Healthy?

Habits can help and habits can hurt.  We all have them, whether we know it or not. You may slouch in a chair or in the car, always stand with most of your weight on one leg, carry a purse on the same shoulder, or lift things with the same arm. These repeated patterns can take a toll.  Sometimes you can get stuck moving in the same way that worked well for a while, but now it no longer allows you to move freely or without pain. 102548-w225

Massage therapy offers many benefits for pain and stress reduction, as well as stimulating circulation. But, once you leave the massage table and go about your day, you may undo some of the healing benefits through your habits of motion. The way to break this pattern is through greater awareness.  If you’re experiencing pain or limited motion, take a moment to notice what movement you just did.  Is it something that you do often?  If it is, is there a different way to get the job done that is more comfortable for your body?  For example, does your shoulder hurt when you’re at the computer?  If that’s when you notice pain, try switching your mouse to your other hand.

Because body awareness is an integral part of the process of changing your habits, it’s essential that you recognize the patterns you have as you move throughout the day. Once you’re consciously aware of those patterns, you can make better choices about how you move.  With increased awareness and commitment to change, you can reduce the physical stress your body experiences on a daily basis.  With time, more beneficial patterns will become your new healthy habits.


Nourish Your Body

To quote my favorite nutritionist, Nurse-Practitioner Deb Dittner, “Too many of us are magnesium deficient as we do not take in the amount necessary to maintain a healthy body.  Additionally, magnesium deficiencies can occur due to stress, whether that stress is physical or emotional, and can occur from taking certain medications such as diuretics.”

If you’re having regular muscle cramps, it may be due to low magnesium levels.  You can get this checked with a simple blood test, but you need to ask your doctor about it specifically.  Magnesium is not checked in a routine blood test.  Magnesium is not included in most multi-vitamin supplements either so you need to look for those supplements separately.  You can increase your magnesium intake by what you eat. My favorite foods that are magnesium-rich are pumpkin seeds, brazil nuts, and spinach.  It’s important to be aware of the role of this vital nutrient in your overall health.  It can affect not only your muscles, but your heart and blood vessels, your sleeping patterns, anxiety levels, blood sugar regulation, pain perception, and so much more.  Deb will be releasing a nutrition book later this year.  I’ll fill you in on the details when I know more.


You Can Use Essential Oils Everyday!

You really can use essential oils everyday.  They are an all natural, chemical-free way to take care of yourself and your family.  You can even replace many items in your medicine cabinet with essential oils.  Here are some favorite uses from Vicki Witten: 

“When my granddaughter falls and scrapes her knee, I put a drop of Geranium or Lavender to help stop the bleeding and apply Pan Away or Lavender to make it all feel better.

“When I’m feeling sad or blue, I apply the Joy blend on my heart and feel an inner smile.

“When I feel that tickling in my throat that signals a cold coming on, I put a few drops of Thieves blend in a glass or water and gargle/ drink it to help stop whatever it is before it can even get a foothold.

“When I feel indigestion or a flu coming on, I apply Di-gize blend to my tummy and/or take it internally and feel wonderful relief.

“When I get a mosquito bite or a bee sting, I put Purification blend on the bite and feel relief and the next day wonder where that old bite was.

“When I’m having a hard time getting to sleep at night, I deeply breathe in sandalwood and feel that I almost melt into my bed. (Sometimes I love to run my fingers through my hair so the aroma lasts even longer!)

“When I’m having a hard time concentrating and staying focused, I breathe in peppermint and put a drop on my tongue and feel alert and refreshed.

“It’s hard to say what is my favorite use of these wonderful essential oils, as I just can’t imagine a day without them.”

Get Your Oils Today or Find Out More at www.Lesley.VibrantScents.com


Pro Baseball Players Benefit From Cupping

Mets pitcher, Matt Harvey, recently started using cupping therapy, an ancient Chinese form of alternative medicine.  Mets Relief pitcher, Vic Black, has been a proponent of cupping therapy for more than two years.  “It’s something I can feel immediate relief from,” said Harvey, who is currently rehabbing from Tommy John elbow-ligament replacement surgery.

The sudden proliferation of cupping within the Mets and other major-league teams illustrates the lengths to which professional athletes will go to try to stay in top physical shape.

baseball pitcher - the mets

“As an athlete, I want to play as long as possible,” said Matsuzaka, the 33-year-old right-hander who started cupping about two years ago. “In order to do that, I need to find ways to protect my body. I’m always looking for something that might be better.”

The millennia-old art of cupping traditionally involved using a flame to create a vacuum inside a glass bulb, which is then applied to the skin for as long as 15 minutes. Blood is pulled to the area, providing relief of tight, sore muscles.  Some believe that cupping can also help with arthritis, eczema and migraine headaches, among other ailments.  Massage cupping is a gentler form of cupping, using an electrical suction pump to create a consistent vacuum.

Nick Paparesta, the trainer for the Oakland Athletics, said in an interview that virtually the entire A’s roster has undergone

cupping therapy at some point this season. Paparesta called it a “twofold solution” because it can provide both immediate and long-term relief of lower back or oblique tightness, and can be done post-surgery to help reduce scarring.

Yuliya Chernyak, a Manhattan-based licensed acupuncturist who performs cupping therapy on athletes, said the therapy works to relieve muscle stiffness and pain, reduce swelling and even treat illness because it “loosens up the mucous, increases circulation, stimulates lungs and helps to fight the infection.”

When done correctly, cupping isn’t painful, though the patient may feel pressure and residual soreness afterward.

“We pull muscles out and increase circulation,” Chernyak said. “It removes toxins and brings all the stagnant blood and waste from deep within the tissue to the surface so that it will be easily eliminated.”

Several Mets have noticed the results, including decreased soreness after the games.

Not every Met has gotten on board. Injured reliever Bobby Parnell, for one, said he doesn’t expect to try it. But the players who have tried it seem unconcerned about the debate as to the lack of scientific evidence supporting the practice.  “I’ve had it done on myself, and I feel the difference,” Matsuzaka said. “I feel that it loosens up my muscles, and I feel that it’s effective.”

In other words, if the players think cupping works, then cupping works. For the most part, the Mets’ players echoed that sentiment. Though they insist that cupping does have a physical effect, they also recognize the mental aspect. Black, one of the team’s most ardent supporters of the treatment, said, “The placebo effect is a lot more powerful than people realize.”

Said Harvey, “If I went in and did it and just saw a bunch of circles on my back and it didn’t actually feel better after I did it, then I wouldn’t do it.”

Try it for yourself!  I can offer you a five minute demo of massage cupping with any treatment except raindrop.  If you like it, I’ll use it.  If you don’t, I won’t.  Every massage is your time on the table, so please help me tailor it so that you get the treatment you like.  Schedule at www.MassageByLesley.com


Massage Improves Your Balance

As we age, a whole host of new health issues arise.  Massage helps with many of these concerns, but studies are finding even more benenfits.  Not surprisingly, research supported by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) showed that frequent massage reduces the pain associated with osteoarthritis.  Other studies have found massage maintains normal blood pressure, relieves sensations of pain, reduces fatigue, and decreases depression and anxiety.

What is surprising is that massage improves your balance which is of increasing concern as the years progress. Research published in the International Journal of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork found that adults who receive massage therapy benefit from decreased blood pressure and improved stability.

If you’d like to learn more about how to improve your self-care between massages, visit www.Lesley.VibrantScents.com


Gardening is Good for You

Getting your hands dirty and letting your cares fall away can be a meditative experience for the gardener, explains Charlie Nardozzi, horticulturist for the National Gardening Association (NGA) in Burlington, Vt.

“It’s a place to get lost in,” he says. “When people go out to garden, it’s often the first time that day they’ve slowed down and relaxed a little bit.”

On a physiological level, this calming effect lowers stress hormones that may ease a variety of conditions such as heart disease, hypertension, gastrointestinal disorders and insomnia. “I encourage people to visit their garden everyday, even if they’re not working on it,” Nardozzi says. “When you reconnect with the weather, temperature, butterflies and other animals, you get a better sense of the cycle and rhythm of life.”

Of course, many gardeners also welcome the physical workout. Planting, watering, weeding, raking, digging, spading, tilling and trimming increase flexibility, strengthen joints and work all the major muscle groups. “The key with gardening,” Nardozzi says, “is to vary the type of work you’re doing, for example doing three different activities for 10 minutes each.” As the summer heats up, make sure you drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration, which can contribute to headaches and muscle cramping.

“I repel insects in my garden without chemicals. In a standard size spray bottle, fill it almost full of water and then add enough Young Living Thieves cleaner to color the water. You will know you put enough Thieves cleaner in the bottle when the insects scatter when you spray your vegetables and such. I grow tomatoes in Florida with no worms, aphids, or grasshoppers. This spray also works on rose bushes and squash plants. Then use it to wipe down your kitchen countertops.” Karen VanSchenck


Happy Fourth of July!

Erma Bombeck says,

“You have to love a nation that celebrates its independence every July 4, not with a parade of guns, tanks, and soldiers who file by the White House in a show of strength and muscle, but with family picnics where kids throw Frisbees, the potato salad gets iffy, and the flies die from happiness. You may think you have overeaten, but it is patriotism.”

For essential oils, visit www.Lesley.VibrantScents.com

For massages, visit www.MassageByLesley.com

 


Local Authors Read This Thursday

The Academy for Lifelong Learning, sponsored by SUNY Empire State College, presents readings from

The Apple Tree

This Thursday June 26 at 7 pm
Northshire Boookstore, 42 Broadway in Saratoga Springs, NY
For more information, visit www.esc.edu/ALL